Podcast: Digging in with ONN

Digging in with ONN is a podcast that focuses on the issues that matter to the nonprofit sector in Ontario. With a public policy lens, we will discuss the realities faced by individuals and organizations in our sector. 

This first podcast series supports ONN’s efforts to advance Decent Work and will be using an intersectional lens that centers on Truth and Reconciliation, Racial justice and equity practices. Decent Work is a term coined by the International Labour Organization to describe what good work looks like – fair, stable, and productive. Decent work specifically ties together the goals of social protection, economic security, thriving businesses and community well-being. 

Podcast Hosts:

Image of Yamikani Msosa

Yamikani (they/them) is a Black genderqueer Malawian arrivant currently living in Tkaronto who grew up as a visitor on Algonquin Territory. As a creative, strategic consultant and facilitator, they love building containers for connections to be forged, and holding space for individual, community, and systems transformation. Yamikani is committed to a practice of anti-racism, decolonization and anti-oppression, using popular culture, creative facilitation, emergent strategy and digital engagement. They completed hir Master’s degree in Women and Gender Studies at Carleton University, and a Certificate from Michigan State University in Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and Organizational Change. Yami currently sits on the eQuality Project Advisory Committee, Black Femme Legal Toolkit Advisory and Cossette Media Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council.

Image of Kavita Dogra

Kavita (she/her) has been in the NFP sector for over a decade and has a variety of communications skills. She spent the last 4 years developing her digital engagement strategy skills and learning how to build and grow digital audiences. Kavita is the founder of We Talk Women, a humble organization working to raise awareness about girls’ and women’s rights issues. Through the organization, she hosts events that expose the human rights injustices being experienced by women and girls in Canada and around the world. Kavita also co-chaired the committee that organized the Women’s March in Toronto (2017-2019).

Our goal is to make public policy discussions more accessible and through storytelling, shed light on the issues that our sector’s workers and volunteers are facing. 

All of our episodes will be available below with transcription but to help us reach more people, please like, subscribe and share!

Episode 0 – Welcome to Digging In With ONN 

This inaugural episode of Diggin In with ONN sets the intention for the series on Decent Work and gives a preview of what’s to come as we dive into topics of racial equity, Truth and Reconciliation, organizational and individual systems change as it relates to diversity & inclusion within the nonprofit sector and more with leaders who are working to reshape the sector.

Episode 0 transcript.

Episode 1- Decent Work Movement Building

The Decent Work movement building has been part of ONN’s fabric for the last several years. Join us as Pamela Uppal, Policy Advisor at ONN breaks down how nonprofits can lean into creating equitable conditions for workers in the nonprofit sector using Decent Work practices. 

Guest biography: Pamela (she/her) cares deeply about how women experience the world and so her work over the past 10 years has focused on creating gender-equitable systems by bridging frontline work, research initiatives, and policy advocacy. Currently, she is a policy advisor at the Ontario Nonprofit Network leading their decent work, care economy and future of work portfolios.

Episode 1 transcript.

Episode 2 – Anti-Black racism and solutions for change

Over the last decade, Rudayna Bahubeshi has tirelessly advocated for racial justice and equity. In this episode, we unpacked systemic and interpersonal realities of anti-Black racism and racism within the nonprofit sector, while exploring formal and informal solutions for change within the sector.

Guest biography: Rudayna Bahubeshi is an advocate for advancing equity and justice and has nearly ten years of experience in nonprofits, charities and government. She is Black and Arab, of Eritrean and Yemeni descent, and lives in Tkaronto. She has led programming, communications, and stakeholder engagement strategies at various nonprofits and charities, and has worked on a number of political campaigns. Recently, she completed her Master of Public Policy at McGill University’s Max Bell School. 

Resource: Over-scrutinized, underfunded, and unsupported: How systemic anti-Blackness affects who gets grants and sector workers’ well-being 

Episode 2 transcript.