Decent Work case studies

Take a deeper dive into nonprofits’ experiences in building decent work solutions. See what works and learn from leaders in the sector.

Building a culture of decent work in nonprofit organizations requires flexibility, creativity, and tenacity. These qualities helped shape decent work journeys of three different agencies that support newcomers in Ontario. Read more.

Nonprofits seeking to develop decent work solutions for their organizations can start by looking at their home communities. For Michael Harris, executive director of Kingston-based KEYS Job Centre, the connections between organization, staff, and community were clear. Read more.

Intention and planning count for more than money when it comes to sustaining decent work. At Catholic Crosscultural Services (CCS), this involves building a culture of engagement for all staff. Read more.

logo for catholic crosscultural services
Wesley logo

At a time when many nonprofits face uncertain funding and regulatory futures, one organization has found stability through decent work. For Wesley, a Hamilton-based multi-services agency, that starts with treating staff as partners, providing opportunities for advancement and engagement. Read more.

Effective decent work practices can help address systemic inequalities experienced by staff and clients alike by contributing to flexible and inclusive workplaces. For Scarborough Women’s Centre (SWC), decent work research offered insights into the challenges that women with disabilities face in navigating employment and practices that promote the inclusion of women with disabilities in the workforce. Read more.

logo for Scarborough Women's Centre

Organizations looking to build a culture of decent work can take a simple, but important step in developing a successful approach: listen first, then respond. It’s a practice that has served DeafBlind Ontario Services well, leading to a comprehensive approach that connects to the organization’s strategic vision, and extends through operating plans and day-to-day activities. Read more.

For the Hospitality Workers Training Centre (HWTC), decent work is grounded in empowering staff and clients alike. We spoke with Ken Tang, Director of Programs and Services, about how his organization works to build a culture of decent work for the hospitality industry. Read more.

Hospitality Workers Training Centre logo